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The One About Falcon Graduating

Falcon has moved on and is now an official program called Flow Design, which also has a free student version!  Dive into it…i will hopefully post a screen cast soon – it is similar to Wind Tunnel in Vasari, but a few items make it preferable (my opinion).

-dave.

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The One About the Restart

It has been a long time away, largely driven by not having taught a class in digital design technology last semester, but i am going to begin regular posts again to track the basic coursework on introducing BIM methodology.  The opening series of videos, as i get back in the swing of bloggage, will be covering Vasari and design simulation (similar to posts already on this site, but updated for Beta3), and will also cover some more advanced areas of research including Revit to Real work on the Rep2 (3d printer) and our ShopBot (CnC), as well as Revit to VR using the Oculus Rift.  For now, here is a peek at the intro to Vasari Beta 3:

-dave.

The One About Simulation Modifications

Continuing on with Vasari, and still keeping it on the basic introductory level, the following techniques begin to help you tweek settings while experimenting to decrease energy consumption. Like all things, it takes a bit of balance, and some understanding of what you are ultimately spending to achieve gains in efficiency.

-dave.

The One About WindSim

Vasari has an excellent tool set to work wind into the design of your project.  This particular tutorial set looks at wind analysis by dialing in the wind rose, and then puts the wind rose to use with the Wind Tunnel module of Vasari.  Great tools!!!  I will revisit Wind Tunnel later (or project Falcon) to look at wind flow through interior spaces with Revit models.

-dave.

The One About Vasari, Beta 2, Step Two (Energy)

Ok, second in the series of four videos to get you rolling on pre-design building simulation in Vasari.  This video covers the bridge from massing to simulation.

-dave.

The One About Vasari, Beta 2, Step One…

If you have been following my videos or the blog for any amount of time then you know i think Vasari is one of the most important, and relevant tools for any designer at any level. Full building simulation during the discovery phase of the design process is a design imperative. “A designer who can’t wait for a complete, carefully prepared program is like a tailor who doesn’t bother to measure a customer before starting to cut the cloth. Experienced, creative designers withhold judgment and resist preconceived solutions and the pressure to synthesize until all the information is in” (Pena & Parshall 2001 – Problem Seeking). Create data, let it help you drive the design! Data is good…yes…i said it…data is good.

-dave.

The One About Falcon in Revit

Another look at Project Falcon from Autodesk.  Note:  Not my video, not my music…not sure on the strategy from the kids at Autodesk, i will try and put something together with a bit of substance here over break.

-dave.

The One About Cloth and Wind

So, back in the day we would spend a few hours/days/weeks trying to find the right way to drape an object with virtual fabric…modeling the folds, layers, and etc. by modifying individual points on a plane.  And really *sarcasm on* it made us much better artists…because spending hours/days/weeks modeling and tweeking points on a modified plane was far more valuable than the iterative nature of actually employing variations on the motion of the cloth that is important to the design *sarcasm off.*  The process in Max is very simple, very fast, and provides results that allow you to worry about the design implications of transparency, fluidity, motion, lightness…and all the items that carry design concept rather than FX.  This is one of the many tools in Max that make me want to yell:  “that’s great…now get the model out of Revit and make it MOVE!”

-dave.

The One About the AU Preview – Revit to Force Effect

This November at Autodesk University i will be presenting research that i have been investing quite a bit of time in as of late.  As an architect, i am a bit jealous of some of the tools that engineers have to help with building analysis.  It would seem to me that the size of a structural member, more informed ball park guess, is an incredibly relevant piece of building design information even in the earliest phases of the design process.  As designers, we use three key tools of formative expression:  Space, Enclosure and Structure (Ching, 1979 – and yes, i am old enough to have the first edition of Form Space and Order).  As designers, i think we are comfortable with the explorations of space and enclosure, and that we understand the basics of what a structure can do (it holds up things), but it is rare that designers really engage structural thinking as part of a design process.  Maybe it is math?  Maybe it is the disconnect between analytical and visual thinking?  To be honest, i have no idea…but, i do know that there are major software improvements ready to have a profound effect on how we learn structural design in the academy, how we can visualize structural performance/solutions, and perhaps how we can begin to employ structural thinking as part of design thinking in the architectural studio.  This first video links Revit to Force Effect (available on the iphone/ipad for free) for a predesign evaluation of 2d structural forces.  NOTE:  I am not a structural engineer, and there is a good chance that i butcher both the technical and performance descriptions in the video…for that i apologize.  This is the first pass, i wanted to go ahead and make it available to see what everyone thinks.  I will edit as i refine my understanding of terminology and application!

-dave.

The One That Pushes Vasari Forms to Revit

The next two videos cover the process of moving your massing model in Vasari (that you have run through the ENTIRE gamut of simulation on) into Revit to transition from massing, to building information modeling. Designers, architects, fellow students and scholars – there is NO reason why EVERY project shouldn’t begin with a base line understanding of how massing and site impact the design performance of your project. Dive and and learn Vasari. Uber easy, tools you already know, and data that we need as building performance is a design imperative.

-dave.